In for a much needed review is the ADATA Premier PC4-25600. This is a 32 GB SO-DIMM memory stick with a speed of 3200 MT/s, wrapped in a price point of $80 USD at Amazon per stick.

This memory module is remarkable for DDR4 standards, featuring stacked banks to achieve its capacity. That said, we actually have two of these sticks here, allowing us to test it in dual channel mode with a maximum memory capacity of 64 GB. This makes the seemingly budget oriented memory a candidate to make any aging system up to date this side of 2024.

Disclosure: ADATA sent a single stick of the Premier PC4-25600 for the purpose of this review. The brand did not ask me to say anything particular about it.

Technical Specifications

Memory
SDRAM DDR4
Interface SO-DIMM
Capacity 32 GB
Speed 3200 MT/s (JEDEC)
Timings 22-22-22 (JEDEC)
Voltage 1.2 V (JEDEC)
Dimensions
Length 69.6 mm
Width 3.8 mm
Height 30 mm
Weight 21.1 g

Packaging and Accessories

The Premier PC4-25600 we got comes in a retail packaging – just so you know ADATA also offers such in trays. We got two obviously, but they use different plastics depending on batches I suppose. These retail packaging are also meant to house a full size DIMM.

adata premier pc4 25600 ddr4 so dimm 32 gb memory 2

Scope of delivery are as follows:

  • 2x ADATA Premier PC4-25600 memory

Nothing else to see here folks.

Design, Layout and Connectivity

The Premier PC4-25600 in its 32 GB model is rather bland looking but it is far from it by technicality. This is a DDR4 SO-DIMM, yet ADATA managed to pack 16x 2 GB ICs, featuring a total of 32 GB memory each stick.

adata premier pc4 25600 ddr4 so dimm 32 gb memory 3

One of SO-DIMM’s appeal is how small the package is and with DDR4 based systems out there, you have to option to practically slap it on any compatible units. You may even use SO-DIMMs on desktop boards (LO-DIMM) using an adapter but I had middling experience with such. Basically, I only managed to get a stick working and at 2666 MHz speeds with such adapters. In the end, we eventually decided to go with a thin-client system that supports SO-DIMMs out of the box.

adata premier pc4 25600 ddr4 so dimm 32 gb memory 1

The memory we got features the part number AD4S320032G22-SGN. That’s basically short for ADATA DDR4 SO-DIMM 3200 MHz 32 GB CL22 Single Tray Green. Now, the benchmarks you’ll see for this review is a courtesy of a AMD Ryzen 5 5600G on a X300 chipset based thin client motherboard.

adata premier pc4 25600 ddr4 so dimm 32 gb memory 5

Throughput

Read, write and copy averages at 44.77, 25.56, and 40.42 GB/s respectively. Latency on the other hand is rated at 78.3 ns. Respectable results for our 3200 MHz SO-DIMM.

Encryption

AES performance is rated at 55,622 MB/s, while SHA3 is rated at 1,937 MB/s. Practically in-line with other DDR4 memory groups.

3D Rendering

As for Blender 4.0, the Ryzen 5 5600G with the Premier PC4-25600 scored 64.1, 43.68, and 33.74 SPM at its Monster, Junkshop and Classroom benchmarks. Acceptable results we got here from the AMD thin client system.

AI Inference

Procyon’s AI inference benchmark results are slow – at least when compared to our DDR5 results. See our ADATA XPG LANCER RGB DDR5-6000 review for reference.

Content Creation

Now as for Adobe applications, we got an acceptable score via UL Procyon. The PC4-25600 out-scored even the AMD Ryzen 7600 here with its faster Radeon Vega 7 integrated GPU.

Productivity

Productivity score is absolutely lower compared to my AM5/DDR5 system but it is not that bad at all.

Compression

As for compression performance, 7-Zip starts at 65.68 GIPS, steadily slowing down until it reaches 57.27 GIPS at the 256 MB test which is equivalent to almost 20 GB of RAM usage.

Gaming

Now gaming performance is where the Ryzen 5600G shines and it shows. This system actually beats the AMD Ryzen 5 7600 along with its integrated GPU 4 out of 4 titles tested. All of them are playable too, even reaching 128.4 FPS on average at Assetto Corsa.

Final Thoughts

Boasting a substantial 32 GB capacity each and a speed of 3200 MT/s, the ADATA Premier PC4-25600 stands as a powerhouse solution for revitalizing aging systems, particularly when utilized in dual channel mode for a staggering 64 GB of memory capacity.

Despite its unassuming appearance, the Premier PC4-25600 packs a punch in its compact form factor suitable for a myriad of compatible devices – from laptops to desktops and everything in between.

Benchmark assessments conducted on an AMD Ryzen 5 5600G system reveals commendable performance metrics across the board, including good read, write, and copy speeds. While not groundbreaking, the memory module delivers robust results in demanding tasks such as Blender 4.0 and Adobe applications, along with exceeding my expectations in terms of its gaming performance.

Nevertheless, it’s crucial to acknowledge that when compared to DDR5 memory systems, the Premier PC4-25600 exhibits slower overall benchmark results. That said, it remains as a good option, providing reliable performance output for everyday computing tasks.

In closing, the ADATA Premier PC4-25600 stands as a cost-effective solution for those who are seeking to inject a new life into their aging systems without denting their wallets. It offers a blend of performance, capacity, and affordability; rightfully earning its place as a contender in today’s still competitive DDR4 memory market.

ADATA Premier PC4-25600 DDR4 Memory $80 USD
Value Award

Product Name: Premier PC4-25600 DDR4 SO-DIMM (32 GB)

Product Description: The ADATA Premier DDR4 3200 SO-DIMM memory modules for notebooks arrive in convenient 8 GB to 32 GB for instant upgrades on any compatible notebook.

Brand: ADATA

8/10

Summary

The ADATA Premier PC4-25600 presents a cost-effective option for users looking to breathe new life into their systems without breaking the bank, offering a balance of performance, capacity, and affordability that makes it a worthy consideration in today’s market.

Pros

  • Commendable performance output
  • Capacity per stick considering the technology
  • Good upgrade option for aging DDR4 systems

Cons

  • Price a bit high compared to LO-DIMM counterparts

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